Speed limits

Learn about the new lowered speed limits in Minneapolis.

Minneapolis and Saint Paul lowered speed limits in 2020 to make streets safer.

Why traffic speed matters for safety

Traffic speed management is a focus area for our Vision Zero work. Higher traffic speeds make crashes more likely to happen. It also makes crashes more likely to result in a severe injury or death.

  • A person hit at 20 miles per hour has a 13% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.
  • A person hit at 40 miles per hour has a 73% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.

(National research)

See video explaining new speed limits in:

The new speed limits

20 is plenty, slower is safer speed limit promo sign

New speed limits are in effect in Minneapolis and Saint PaulSlower speeds on local streets make travel safer for everyone no matter how you get around.

New speed limits 

  • 20 mph for local residential streets (unless otherwise signed)
  • 25 mph for larger, arterial city-owned streets
  • 30-plus mph for a few city-owned streets
  • 30-plus mph for County and MnDOT roads (No change)

Our map shows what the speed limits will be on individual streets.

View the new speed limits map

County and MNDot roads are not affected

County and MnDOT road speed limits in Minneapolis and Saint Paull will not change. Per Minnesota law, cities do not have authority to change speed limits on these streets.

 

Speed is a major factor in crashes

Art of crowd of people in white. The people in red depict deaths. Takaway: A person hit at 20 miles per hour has a 13% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying. A person hit at 30 miles per hour has a 40% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying. A person hit at 40 miles per hour has a 73% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.

Why traffic speed matters for safety

Higher traffic speeds make crashes more likely to happen. It also makes crashes more likely to end in severe injury or death. This is especially true for people walking or rolling and biking.

  • A person hit at 20 miles per hour has a 13% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.
  • A person hit at 30 miles per hour has a 40% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.
  • A person hit at 40 miles per hour has a 73% likelihood of suffering a severe injury or dying.

The risk of severe injury or death is higher for older adults.

(National research)

Background on lowered speed limits

Speed limit analysis

The speed limit changes follow detailed technical studies done by the Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul Public Works departments, respectively, to determine appropriate local speed limits as required by state statute.

The lower speed limits are in line with national trends toward lower urban speed limits to support safety. Lower traffic speeds reduce the likelihood of a crash and make all types of crashes less likely to lead to death or a life-changing injury. A person hit at 35 mph is three times as likely to die as someone hit at 25 mph.

Reducing speed limits is one of the key strategies in the Minneapolis Vision Zero Action Plan, which outlines key steps for the next three years to advance the City’s goal of ending traffic deaths and injuries on City streets by 2027.

Read the City of Minneapolis Speed Limit Evaluation

View the data: Speed is a major factor in crashes

 

Part of a comprehensive approach to safe speeds

Given the importance of traffic speeds in supporting safety, supporting safe speeds is a priority in our Vision Zero work. Safe speeds can vary for different types of streets based on the context, demands, and design.

No single speed-related action alone will lead to safe speeds

We need a combination of the following

  • Policy changes
  • Street design
  • Education
  • Communications
  • Enforcement 
Employee installing 20 mph speed limits sign
My best idea for making my street safer is: Slow cars. 20 is plenty!
My best idea for making my street safer is: Slow cars. 20 is plenty!
Installed 25 mph speed limits sign

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