Help spread the word about ranked-choice voting at National Night Out

As thousands of people gather for National Night Out events on Tuesday, Aug. 6, the City would like to encourage folks who are having gatherings to help spread the word about this year’s municipal election, which will use ranked-choice voting. On Nov. 5, Minneapolis will use ranked-choice voting for the second time to elect a mayor and members of the City Council, Board of Estimate and Taxation, and Park and Recreation Board. In ranked-choice voting, each ballot has three columns, and voters can rank up to three candidates in order of their preference for each office.

All registered National Night Out events have received informational fliers about the election and ranked-choice voting to share with residents. That flier is also available online at vote.minneapolismn.gov/volunteer/education so anyone can print the flier and share it. Voter ambassadors and other volunteers will also be visiting many of the block parties to share more information and answer questions from residents about the election.

To learn more about ranked-choice voting, and to learn how to be ready for the Nov. 5 election, visit the City’s new elections website at vote.minneapolismn.gov. On the site, you’ll find a new video and an interactive demonstration ballot to help you learn how to use ranked-choice voting. Sharing the word at National Night out will help make sure everyone is ready for this fall’s election.

Get ready for the Nov. 5 election

The City of Minneapolis has launched a new elections website to help voters get ready for this fall’s election. By visiting vote.minneapolismn.gov, voters can learn what they need to know about how to register to vote, find their polling place, and many other elections topics. Because Minneapolis will use ranked-choice voting this year, the website can help folks learn how to vote using ranked-choice voting, and they can see how ballots are counted. Ranked-choice voting gives voters the opportunity to rank up to three candidates for each office. The website features an interactive demonstration ballot that voters can use to learn how to mark a ranked-choice ballot and a new video that explains everything you need to know about ranked-choice voting.

Published Aug 2, 2013