Trees need an inch of water every week

While a rainy spring and early summer have temporarily kept our trees watered, our yard and boulevard trees need an inch of water every week throughout the spring, summer and fall. The recent rain has been welcome for trees but not enough to counteract nine years of drought, the driest fall on record and 10th lowest snowfall in more than 100 years. If it rains less than one inch in any week, trees need to be watered to help them recover. Past years of high temperatures and drought conditions are a problem even for otherwise healthy trees and put them at serious risk of long-term damage.

Extended drought conditions can make trees vulnerable to insects and disease and cause permanent damage to young and old trees alike. Young trees three to five years old are especially susceptible.

An effective way for residents to water a tree is to turn on a slow stream of water (just so the hose is weeping) for a few hours. Watering in the evening after dinner time is most effective since it minimizes evaporation, and trees tend to take most of their water during the night. Watering one tree weekly for the warmer months costs only about $3 for the entire season. For people who lose track of when they last watered a tree, a good system could be watering it on the same day trash is picked up.

For information on tree care and the urban forest, contact the Park Board’s Forestry Department at 612-313-7710.

If you hire a tree servicing company to prune a tree, make sure to use a company licensed in Minneapolis to ensure that the tree gets the right care. 

Taking care of our trees means protecting our Minneapolis quality of life. Research proves that healthy trees are beautiful, increase property values, help improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gases by absorbing carbon dioxide, save energy, keep the city cooler, provide homes for wildlife and help manage stormwater.

 

Published Jun. 27, 2012