Information Technology

Flour Exchange Building
310 4th Ave South, Suite 400
Minneapolis, MN 55415

govdelivery_icon Sign up for email about the City’s digital inclusion initiatives, resources and events.

Wireless MinneapolisWireless Minneapolis provides wireless broadband access anywhere in the city. Look for free hotspots called "USI Free Wifi" or sign up for wireless service with USI Wireless.

Digital Incl 2012 Survey-Report Cover Image2012 Community Technology Survey

Access to computers and the Internet, along with the skills to use these tools is critical as technology becomes more and more a part of our daily lives. The City of Minneapolis IT department conducted the 2012 Community Technology Survey, with the help of a grant from the Minneapolis Foundation Digital Inclusion Fund, to determine the state of the digital divide in Minneapolis. The survey gathered data about residents’ access to and experiences with computers, mobile devices and the Internet.

Key Points from the Survey

Why Does It Matter?

Ø  While 82% of City households overall have computers with Internet access, only 57% of Phillips and 65% of Near North residents have access at home.  25% of African Americans reported they don’t have Internet access at home.

Ø  Too many residents do not feel very comfortable finding and applying for jobs online.

Ø  Residents are not comfortable attaining education online.

Ø  Residents aged 55 and older are least likely to be computer and Internet users. 

Ø  The Internet is not being used often by residents to find community resources, engage in civic activities or communicate with government.

Ø  Residents are not seeking health information online.

Ø  Residents do not feel they know enough to deal with cyber security issues.

Ø Most residents are not aware of the City’s WiFi network.

ü  Job postings/applications have moved online.

ü  Employers need well-trained workers—most jobs require increasing levels of computer skills—to effectively compete with others around the world.

ü  Access to technology that promotes the pursuit of productive and creative interests enhances one’s quality of life.

ü  Education often depends upon Internet access—schools use online tools to communicate with students and families. 

ü  The Internet offers access to the online economy, community and business resources, and social/civic engagement opportunities.

ü  Health care providers are increasingly using online tools to connect with patients.

ü  To prosper in today’s information-based world requires access to the world’s knowledge.

See a summary of the survey results, analysis and opportunities and a compilation of results by City Council ward boundaries.  Review the full report and survey questionnaire

Get Involved 

The City is taking on a facilitator role to help digital inclusion stakeholders, community members, and the private sector come together to address the digital divide in Minneapolis.  Many organizations are doing great work to close the digital divide. The survey data is intended to show the current state of the divide in Minneapolis and to help bring people together to review existing resources and identify opportunities to work more effectively to close the gaps.

Community Meeting Notes - share your thoughts on the survey results.  

Interactive maps show survey results for neighborhood clusters in Minneapolis

Digital Incl 2012 Survey-ArcGIS Map ImageUsing the Interactive ArcGIS Map: Digital Incl 2012 Survey-ArcGIS Button Image
1. Click on the "Show Contents of Map" button to see the list of layers in the map.
2. Use the check boxes in the layer list to click on ONE LAYER AT A TIME to view the results for each question.
3. Click on the map itself to display the pop up box for each "Neighborhood Cluster" to see details about the data displayed and what quartile the Neighborhood Cluster is in compared to the city results overall.
4. Use the check boxes in the layer list to turn off the layer and choose a new layer to view results for a different question.  Color schemes are used to organize results into categories: Tools, Skills, Information Consumption, Engagement

The map layers show how each neighborhood cluster compares to the results for the city overall by showing if the cluster is in:

 

Survey Methodology:  The questionnaire was developed in concert between National Research Center, Inc. and the City's Information Technology department, and was designed to capture key thematic areas including resident access to technology, technology use and preferences. The survey cover letter included information in Spanish, Somali and Hmong, and residents were invited to call 311 to request a survey in their language.  Three mailings were sent to a random selection of 800 addresses in each of the 11 communities in the City, a pre-notification postcard and two survey packets, each just under a week apart. The 30% response rate reflects 2,578 completed surveys; the margin of error for comparisons by community is plus or minus nine percentage points. The results were weighted to reflect the 2010 Census profile within each of the 11 communities and the City overall.  

Full data set (Excel file) Updated 4/19/13 - See Update log enclosed

Contact: Elise Ebhardt, Information Technology, 612-673-2026

Digital Inclusion Home

Last updated Apr. 19, 2013