Legal actions

See public data and information on the officers involved, the immediate police response and the decision by the Minnesota Attorney General to charge the officers.

State of Minnesota v. Derek Chauvin

A jury found former officer Derek Chauvin guilty of unintentional second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter on April 20, 2021 in the death of George Floyd. 

View Hennepin County District Court information: State vs. Derek Chauvin

Trial for former officers  

  • Former officer Tou Thao waived his right to a jury trial and joined the State in asking the court for a bench trial. This means the court, not a jury, will render a verdict. Learn more at State v. Tou Thao.  
  • Former officer Thomas Lane pled guilty May 18, 2022 to the crimes of aiding second-degree unintentional murder and aiding second-degree culpable negligence manslaughter. Learn more at State vs. Thomas Kiernan Lane
  • Former officer J. Alexander Kueng pled guilty Oct. 24, 2022 to the crime of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter. Learn more at State vs. J. Alexander Kueng.

Minnesota Department of Human Rights investigation

On April 27, 2022, the Minnesota Department of Human Rights announced there is probable cause that the City of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department engage in a pattern or practice of race discrimination in violation of the Minnesota Human Rights Act.

The MDHR investigation launched June 1, 2020, after former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd on May 25, 2020. 

Learn more about the MDHR investigation findings

United States of America v. Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane

Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin pled guilty in federal court to depriving George Floyd and a minor victim of their constitutional rights on Dec. 15, 2021. 

First, defendant Chauvin pleaded guilty to willfully depriving, while acting under color of law, George Floyd of his constitutional rights, resulting in Mr. Floyd’s bodily injury and death. Defendant Chauvin also agreed that the appropriate sentencing base offense level for this crime is second-degree murder because he used unreasonable and excessive force that resulted in Mr. Floyd’s death, and he acted willfully and in callous and wanton disregard of the consequences to Mr. Floyd’s life.

Second, defendant Chauvin pleaded guilty to willfully depriving, while acting under color of law, a then 14-year-old juvenile of his constitutional rights, resulting in the juvenile’s bodily injury.

One Feb. 24, 2022, a federal jury in St. Paul, found former officers Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane guilty of federal civil rights offenses arising out of the death of George Perry Floyd, Jr. on May 25, 2020. Learn more about the convictions

 

U.S. Justice Department pattern or practice investigation

U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland announced April 21, 2021 the Justice Department has opened a pattern or practice investigation into the City of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department. It follows the murder conviction of former MPD officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The investigation will assess all types of force used by MPD officers, including uses of force involving individuals with behavioral health disabilities and uses of force against individuals engaged in activities protected by the First Amendment. The investigation will also assess whether MPD engages in discriminatory policing. As part of the investigation the Justice Department will conduct a comprehensive review of MPD policies, training and supervision. The department will also examine MPD’s systems of accountability, including complaint intake, investigation, review, disposition and discipline. The Department of Justice will also reach out to community groups and members of the public to learn about their experiences with MPD.

Individuals with relevant information are encouraged to contact the Department of Justice by email or phone. Individuals can also report civil rights violations regarding this or other matters using the Civil Rights Division’s new reporting portal.

Public data available online

Public data originating from the City from the death of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, is available online.