Minneapolis’ 2025 Vision: More People, More Jobs; Every Person, Every Place

 In his 12th and final State of the City address, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak today looked ahead 12 years to the Minneapolis of 2025: a growing, vibrant and connected city with more people and more jobs — for every person and every place.

Speaking at the Walker Art Center, Mayor Rybak delivered much of the speech in character — in the role of mayor of Minneapolis in 2025, delivering the 2025 State of the City address.

The text of Mayor Rybak’s address as prepared for delivery is available here.

In character during the first part of the speech as mayor of Minneapolis in 2025, Mayor Rybak opened with the “controversy” of the time: where and how quickly to build a third Northside high school, because Patrick Henry and North High were “bursting at the seams” due to their top academic rankings and the Northside “population explosion.”

From there, Mayor Rybak’s in-character tour of Minneapolis in 2025 highlighted:

Stepping out of character as mayor in 2025 and back into the present as mayor in 2013, Mayor Rybak drew attention to work that will and must happen in 2013 to move this vision of Minneapolis in 2025 forward. In 2013, Mayor Rybak and the City will, among other things:

Mayor Rybak also highlighted efforts to close racial disparities.

The ability to make this vision a reality rests on the foundation of running the city well. Mayor Rybak highlighted that since 2002, the City has paid down $241 million in debt, cut spending by 16 percent after inflation, avoided a $20-million property-tax hit by reforming the broken closed-pension system, and lifted $5 million annually off the backs of taxpayers by passing the new stadium and Target Center. As a result of this work, property taxes are 35 percent lower in 2013 than they would have been.

Turning the 2025 vision into reality also depends on keeping levels of crime low. The last two years have seen the lowest levels of violent crime in almost three decades. In addition, Mayor Rybak expressed his support of Police Chief Janeé Harteau’s plan to get more officers out of cars and onto streets, and ongoing efforts to recruit officers who better reflect the diversity of Minneapolis’ population.

Mayor Rybak also announced two new initiatives:

In addition, Mayor Rybak issued several calls for action.

Mayor Rybak again highlighted the success of the STEP-UP summer-jobs program in closing gaps: STEP-UP youth are 86 percent people of color, 50 percent from immigrant households and 93 percent from families living in poverty. “STEP-UP is a key strategy for closing both our racial economic gaps and our racial achievement gaps,” he said.

To stress the critical importance of STEP-UP and youth of color to Minneapolis’ future, Mayor Rybak concluded his speech by stepping back into character as mayor of Minneapolis in 2025. In that role, he named the candidates in the 2025 race to succeed him as he retires as mayor — all of whom were once STEP-UP interns in his office.  

 

Published Apr. 10, 2013