Grants & Special Projects

350 S. 5th St., Room 301M
Minneapolis, MN 55415
Phone: (612) 673-2043

Grants Assistance

The City of Minneapolis Office of Grants & Special Projects is not a grant-making agency. However, we are available to answer City of Minneapolis grant-related questions.

Other Resources

Listed below are informational resources about seeking grants.
Please note: This is general information that applies primarily to foundation and corporate giving programs (vs. Federal or State applications). The grant application guidelines take precedence over any information listed here.

The most recommended link in the list below is the Minnesota Council on Foundations. Specifically, the section on Grantseeking Resources.

Overview of grant seeking process
Planning the project and grant proposal 
(including the logic model)
Data sources

Researching grant-makers

Calling potential funders

Developing a grants calendar

Proposal writing

Budget

Site visits

Follow Up

Overview of grant seeking process

As you seek funding remember that grants are only one possible source of funding. For example, a large percentage of donations are often made by individuals. According to the Minnesota Council on Foundations, "Individual charitable giving continued to comprise the highest portion of state giving, accounting for 78 percent of the total." – Minnesota Council on Foundations, Giving in Minnesota, 2006 Edition.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Planning the project and grant proposal

The Logic Model is a useful tool for project planning and for preparing to write a grant proposal. Use this method to identify what activities require funding, what resources are needed, and what will result from the funded activities.

Evaluation is an important piece of any project. Evaluation tells funders about the grant’s effectiveness and informs you of what worked well and what can be done better. Planning the evaluation before the project starts will help ensure that the process is practical to carry out and informs your work.

Commonly requested attachments for grant applications include the IRS determination letter, financial reports, and other documents. For further information refer to the list of attachments on the MN Common Grant Form.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Data sources – information to support your grant proposal

When writing your needs statement in a grant proposal, it may be helpful to report data that describes who will be served and the issue to be addressed.  Examples include population, age, ethnicity, and income.  Below are links to sources of commonly used data.

City of Minneapolis

State of Minnesota

Federal

Other

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Researching grant-makers

Consider a potential funder’s:

The Foundation Center offers a Prospect Worksheet  to record your findings.

Where to find information

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Calling potential funders

If the funder welcomes a phone call, prepare for a brief conversation in which you explain the project for which you are seeking funding, highlighting how the project matches the funder’s interests.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Developing a grants calendar

Plan a schedule so that application deadlines do not sneak up on you.

Use a Resource Development Worksheet to determine potential resources for the project.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Proposal writing

See the following sites for writing tips and examples.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Budget

The budget is an important section of any grant proposal. Sometimes reviewers may read the budget first (before reading the narrative).

Visit the MN Council on Foundations Writing a Successful Grant Proposal for information about budgets.

For assistance with non-profit finances consider contacting MAP for Nonprofits .

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Site visits

After reviewing your proposal, a funder may want to visit your organization.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Follow Up

If approved – make sure to say thank you. Give the funder appropriate recognition. Complete all reports. Keep the funder updated.

If declined – follow up to ask why and respond appropriately. Thank the funder for the consideration.

Return to Start of Section - Resources

Find further information on the Grants Foundations, Funding Opportunities and Resources by Category pages.

Last updated May 8, 2012