Thank you for your participation in the 2010 Census

You did it! Final 2010 mail participation rates were announced in October, 2010 and Minneapolis came in at 78 percent, up 2 percent from the preliminary participation rate announced in April. This rate put Minneapolis at 5th place nationally for cities over 100,000 in population, just behind St. Paul which came in 4th at 79 percent. Minneapolis can be proud of the hard work of our Complete Count Committees and many community groups, churches and other agencies helping to get out the message: “It’s in Our Hands.” The increase in mail participation rates from Census 2000 was dramatic, as this new comparison map shows.

View map comparing 2000 and 2010 participation rates (pdf), and table of final participation rates for cities over 100,000 (doc).

See the Final Report on the City’s 2010 Census Outreach and Presentation (pdf) to the Dec. 16, 2010 meeting of the Committee of the Whole.

Participation Rate Award

On August 11, 2010, Debra Stanley of the Kansas City Regional Census Bureau visited Minneapolis City Hall to present City leaders with an award for its extraordinary success in local outreach efforts for the 2010 Census. As of May, the City's mail back "participation rate" was 76%, up from 68% in 2000 and the highest of any city with populations of 300,000 or more in the country."


City leaders and staff receiving the ‘Participation Rate’ recognition from Debra Stanley of the Kansas City Regional Office. From left to right are: Sok Silaphet, CPED, Claudia Fuentes, Mayor’s office, Saeed Fahia, Confederation of Somali Communities, Debra Stanley, Hannah Garcia, CURA, Council Member Robert Lilligren, and Jeff Schneider, CPED

An accurate count of Minneapolis in the 2010 census is vitally important to the city’s future. Census data is used to determine how nearly $400 billion is annually distributed for 170 Federal programs. Census data is also used to determine the need for additional social services, including community development block grants and other grant programs essential to many communities. It is estimated that for every 100 people who are not counted, $1 million is lost to the people of Minneapolis over the next decade. The census is required by law and all the information that can identify respondents or households must remain confidential for at least 72 years. Even the President of the United States cannot access your personal information.

United States Census 2010: It's in our hands.

View census participation rates in your neighborhood (pdf).

Last updated Jun. 8, 2012